apfelgranate:

daxsymbiont:

when I was studying Greek I would get frustrated and annoyed because often, at the beginning of a sentence or clause — or just scattered haphazardly throughout — there would be three or four “particles” with no specific meaning. the literal translation might be “so thus and”, but of course you couldn’t put that down. they were just placeholder words, colloquial linguistic padding.

now, of course, I realize that I start sentences with “okay but like”.

you can sing the praises of the Greeks all you want, but the fact is, Plato wrote with all the elegance and grace of an off-the-cuff tumblr post.

seriously though like let’s not romanticize the past like we do okay we preseverve personal manuscripts as these MAJESTIC RELICS of the past and it’s like no????? half the shit in manuscripts is so fucking dumb hilarious but dumb it’s like preserving the notes i take in class and trying to discern anything serious from them we even do this with things as recent as shakespeare YOU’D THINK after catullus we would learn that humanity has always found fart jokes funny that EVERYONE draws dicks in their notes that AT NO POINT IN HISTORY have we been refined and mature and like I LOVE IT but let’s ADMIT THAT THAT’S THE CASE (via alfonselric)

zuky:

thesmithian:


…[some] may not remember what made Iran-Contra such an extraordinary scandal. The Reagan administration “raised money privately” by selling weapons to a sworn enemy of the United States. Why? Because it wanted to fund an illegal war in Nicaragua. And when I say “illegal war,” I mean that quite literally—Congress told the Reagan administration, in no uncertain terms, that Reagan could not send money to the Contras. Period. The Reagan administration, unrestrained by laws and the Constitution, did so anyway, and much of the president’s national security team ended up under indictment.

more.

Reagan knew everything. However, I bet this Time magazine piece doesn’t get into the juiciest part of Iran-Contra, which is that in the 1980s the CIA put into operation a crack cocaine pipeline to import narcotics from Central and South America and distribute it in US inner cities. This is not a “conspiracy theory”, this is a documented conspiracy, most rigorously researched and reported by Pulitzer-prize winning journalist Gary Webb, whose series in the San Jose Mercury News and subsequent book “Dark Alliance” literally got him killed. To me, that’s the story of Iran-Contra: not that Reagan sold weapons to Iran, but that the US government imported and sold crack to Black America, as part of an arms and drugs trade which funded war in the Third World and which devastated lives and filled prisons in the USA.

zuky:

thesmithian:

…[some] may not remember what made Iran-Contra such an extraordinary scandal. The Reagan administration “raised money privately” by selling weapons to a sworn enemy of the United States. Why? Because it wanted to fund an illegal war in Nicaragua. And when I say “illegal war,” I mean that quite literally—Congress told the Reagan administration, in no uncertain terms, that Reagan could not send money to the Contras. Period. The Reagan administration, unrestrained by laws and the Constitution, did so anyway, and much of the president’s national security team ended up under indictment.

more.

Reagan knew everything. However, I bet this Time magazine piece doesn’t get into the juiciest part of Iran-Contra, which is that in the 1980s the CIA put into operation a crack cocaine pipeline to import narcotics from Central and South America and distribute it in US inner cities. This is not a “conspiracy theory”, this is a documented conspiracy, most rigorously researched and reported by Pulitzer-prize winning journalist Gary Webb, whose series in the San Jose Mercury News and subsequent book “Dark Alliance” literally got him killed. To me, that’s the story of Iran-Contra: not that Reagan sold weapons to Iran, but that the US government imported and sold crack to Black America, as part of an arms and drugs trade which funded war in the Third World and which devastated lives and filled prisons in the USA.

lakidaa:

baroncaveyeti:

snarkbender:

jamsradio:

 

anyone know what this is from?

"Judgement Day" by EC Comics. From wikipedia:

The story depicted a human astronaut, a representative of the Galactic Republic, visiting the planet Cybrinia inhabited by robots. He finds the robots divided into functionally identical orange and blue races, one of which has fewer rights and privileges than the other. The astronaut decides that due to the robots’ bigotry, the Galactic Republic should not admit the planet. In the final panel, he removes his helmet, revealing himself to be a black man.

Apparently the Comics Code Authority tried to prevent the author from making the main character black.

Boy did they! It took the writer (and the company) threatening the CCA with a lawsuit and telling the guy to fuck off (literally) to get this thing printed: 
Comic Historian Digby Diehl recounted in Tales from the Crypt: The Official Archives:

This really made ‘em go bananas in the Code czar’s office. ‘Judge Murphy was off his nut. He was really out to get us’, recalls [EC editor] Feldstein. ‘I went in there with this story and Murphy says, “It can’t be a Black man”. But … but that’s the whole point of the story!’ Feldstein sputtered. When Murphy continued to insist that the Black man had to go, Feldstein put it on the line. ‘Listen’, he told Murphy, ‘you’ve been riding us and making it impossible to put out anything at all because you guys just want us out of business’. [Feldstein] reported the results of his audience with the czar to Gaines, who was furious [and] immediately picked up the phone and called Murphy. ‘This is ridiculous!’ he bellowed. ‘I’m going to call a press conference on this. You have no grounds, no basis, to do this. I’ll sue you’. Murphy made what he surely thought was a gracious concession. ‘All right. Just take off the beads of sweat’. At that, Gaines and Feldstein both went ballistic. ‘Fuck you!’ they shouted into the telephone in unison. Murphy hung up on them, but the story ran in its original form.[18]

lakidaa:

baroncaveyeti:

snarkbender:

jamsradio:

 

anyone know what this is from?

"Judgement Day" by EC Comics. From wikipedia:

The story depicted a human astronaut, a representative of the Galactic Republic, visiting the planet Cybrinia inhabited by robots. He finds the robots divided into functionally identical orange and blue races, one of which has fewer rights and privileges than the other. The astronaut decides that due to the robots’ bigotry, the Galactic Republic should not admit the planet. In the final panel, he removes his helmet, revealing himself to be a black man.

Apparently the Comics Code Authority tried to prevent the author from making the main character black.

Boy did they! It took the writer (and the company) threatening the CCA with a lawsuit and telling the guy to fuck off (literally) to get this thing printed: 

Comic Historian Digby Diehl recounted in Tales from the Crypt: The Official Archives:

This really made ‘em go bananas in the Code czar’s office. ‘Judge Murphy was off his nut. He was really out to get us’, recalls [EC editor] Feldstein. ‘I went in there with this story and Murphy says, “It can’t be a Black man”. But … but that’s the whole point of the story!’ Feldstein sputtered. When Murphy continued to insist that the Black man had to go, Feldstein put it on the line. ‘Listen’, he told Murphy, ‘you’ve been riding us and making it impossible to put out anything at all because you guys just want us out of business’. [Feldstein] reported the results of his audience with the czar to Gaines, who was furious [and] immediately picked up the phone and called Murphy. ‘This is ridiculous!’ he bellowed. ‘I’m going to call a press conference on this. You have no grounds, no basis, to do this. I’ll sue you’. Murphy made what he surely thought was a gracious concession. ‘All right. Just take off the beads of sweat’. At that, Gaines and Feldstein both went ballistic. ‘Fuck you!’ they shouted into the telephone in unison. Murphy hung up on them, but the story ran in its original form.[18]


Two sailors ca. 1940-1945. An image featured in the “Love and War” exhibit at the Kinsey Institute Gallery. More info on the exhibit can be found here.
“The photo is usually seen cropped from the waist up, as it was in the 1980s when the activist organization ACT-UP used in it on a T-shirt in their Read My Lips campaign. But the print hanging in the Kinsey gallery is the original version. Below decks, the sailors’ flies are open, and they are, so to speak, crossing swords.”

Two sailors ca. 1940-1945. An image featured in the “Love and War” exhibit at the Kinsey Institute Gallery. More info on the exhibit can be found here.

The photo is usually seen cropped from the waist up, as it was in the 1980s when the activist organization ACT-UP used in it on a T-shirt in their Read My Lips campaign. But the print hanging in the Kinsey gallery is the original version. Below decks, the sailors’ flies are open, and they are, so to speak, crossing swords.”

salparadisewasright:

estufar:

An actual headline from The New York Times in 1919 


I love this so much.

salparadisewasright:

estufar:

An actual headline from The New York Times in 1919 

I love this so much.

humanoidhistory:

Astronaut Neil Armstrong in his Gemini days, 1966.

humanoidhistory:

Astronaut Neil Armstrong in his Gemini days, 1966.

sci-universe:

These are the depictions of the most intense meteor storm in recorded history – the Leonid meteor storm of 1833. The Leonid meteor shower is annually active in the month of November, and it occurs when the Earth passes through the debris left by the comet Tempel-Tuttle. While the typical rates are about 10 to 15 meteors per hour, the storm of 1833 is speculated to have been over 100,000 meteors per hour, frightening people half to death.
Here’s how Agnes Clerke, an astronomer witnessing the event, described it:  “On the night of November 12-13, 1833, a tempest of falling stars broke over the Earth… The sky was scored in every direction with shining tracks and illuminated with majestic fireballs. At Boston, the frequency of meteors was estimated to be about half that of flakes of snow in an average snowstorm.” (x)

elenei:

keenpeach:

25 abandoned Yugoslav monuments that look like they’re from the future

“These structures were commissioned by former Yugoslavian president Josip Broz Tito in the 1960s and 70s to commemorate sites where WWII battles took place or where concentration camps stood. They were designed by different sculptors and architects, conveying powerful visual impact to show the confidence and strength of the Socialist Republic. In the 1980s, these monuments attracted millions of visitors per year, especially young pioneers for their ‘patriotic education.’ After the Republic dissolved in early 1990s, they were completely abandoned, and their symbolic meanings were forever lost. From 2006 to 2009, Kempenaers toured around the ex-Yugoslavia region with the help of a 1975 map of memorials, bringing before our eyes a series of melancholy yet striking images.”

This is making rounds on my dash again so I will repeat what I said a year ago: these aren’t actually abandoned. And the sentence “their symbolic meaning is forever lost” is not very well-informed, since at least one of these sculptures - the third one of the concrete flower in Jasenovac, near the site of the 1940s death camp, (also Niš, Sisak, and Knin) - still has massive cultural, historical, religious and psychological significance for all the death camp survivors and their families, and everyone who fought in any war for (or against) Yugoslavia. 

This isn’t history: it’s still cultural memory, and its symbolic meanings remain present.

Saying that the Republic ‘dissolved’ is like saying that getting electric shocks to your genitals is ‘slightly unpleasant’ - the Yugoslav Wars lasted for a total of seven years (1991-1995, and then 1998-1999/2001), during which there were all the things you can find in a war with some ethnic cleansing and genocide thrown in for good measure. These sculptures date as far back as the Second World War, that much is accurate, but people still remember: a memorial ceremony is held every year at Jasenovac and other locations, because these things are kind of hard to forget, even though it’s been decades since they occurred. 

This article isn’t only misinformed and inaccurate, it also doesn’t credit the original photographer, and my semi-professional opinion as someone who was born in Yugoslavia is that it’s bullshit.

The pictures are nice, though.

#history  #art  

fiftysevenacademics:

anthrocentric:

This Viking Female Warriors story is all over my everything/social media/news outlets right now

jangojips:

I find it pretty troubling that people historically assumed biological sex from grave good and never actually thought to give clout to the physical human remains themselves. Forensic osteology helps to paint a more accurate picture here, and in this case gave archaeologists solid…

NOOOO!!! HELP I CAN’T ESCAPE THIS STORY. IT’S EVERYWHERE! Inaccurate media representations of archaeology is one of my HUGE pet peeves so I HAVE to respond. For those of you who don’t know, there’s a TRULY WRETCHED tor.com post claiming that new research shows 50% of Viking warriors were female. This is one of the most egregious examples of shitty science reporting I’ve seen in ages for a bunch of reasons.

1. It’s not news. The post they’re referring to is from 2011. So why the big fuss all of a sudden.

2. What the authors of the original study actually say is that around 50% of the skeletons, 6 out of a total of 13, were probably female. ONLY ONE OF THESE FEMALE SKELETONS WAS BURIED WITH A SWORD AND SHIELD. What the authors actually say is that women were a large element of Viking migration. At no point do they claim 50% of the warriors were women. Tor.com says that because no one ever taught them to read carefully or think critically.

3. The authors of the original study are properly cautious regarding their claims about the sex of the skeletons. Everyone knows how difficult it can be to determine sex from osteological remains, and it’s one area where there is almost always some room for debate. Although if you have a complete pelvis, you can usually get a pretty reliable reading of the sex, people generally still refrain from making absolute statements no matter how confident they are.

4. Far from ignoring or overlooking women, what the article actually says is that they believed there were a lot of Viking women in England because so many round brooches of the sort typically worn by women (and not men), have been found. Contrary to what Tumblr would like us to believe, grave goods and artifacts are important and valid sources of information regarding gender, and the large presence of Viking women in England was already hypothesized on the basis of that. So, now someone has tested that hypothesis on a particular population and come up with an actual number— 50%— of females in that population, which will undoubtedly be put to the test in the future and eventually we’ll have an idea how accurate that is. THIS IS GOOD SCIENCE AND IT’S NOT IGNORING OR OVERLOOKING WOMEN. Quite the opposite.

5. What IS unfair to women are popular media posts that make wild, unsubstantiated claims about what women did on the past that then get dragged all around social media and feed into tedious and ill-informed debates about gender roles and male bias in archaeology (which exists, I’m not denying that, but this is not an example of it).

Finally, here is a better post dealing with this topic.

emilianadarling:

deanobanion:


"Horsemanning, or fake beheading, was a popular way to pose in a photograph in the 1920’s. Sometimes spelled horsemaning, the horsemanning photo fad derives its name from the Headless Horseman, a character from “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow.”

(x)

HUMAN BEING ARE AND ALWAYS HAVE BEEN SUCH HUGE FUCKING DORKS OKAY.

emilianadarling:

deanobanion:

"Horsemanning, or fake beheading, was a popular way to pose in a photograph in the 1920’s. Sometimes spelled horsemaning, the horsemanning photo fad derives its name from the Headless Horseman, a character from “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow.”

(x)

HUMAN BEING ARE AND ALWAYS HAVE BEEN SUCH HUGE FUCKING DORKS OKAY.