hiphopfightsplaque:

Elvis Who?//Listen Here
a playlist honoring the creativity of Black rock & roll artists and the rebellious Black youth who kept their records spinning. Also features some Rock en Español.

1.Caldonia-Louis Jordan //2.Shake, Rattle & Roll-Big Joe Turner // 3.Bo Diddley-Bo Diddley // 4.Demolicion-Los Saicos // 5.Johnny B. Goode-Chuck Berry // 6.Tuttie Frutti-Little Richard // 7.Hound Dog-Big Mama Thornton // 8.Roll Over Beethoven-Chuck Berry // 9.La Chica Alborotada-Los Locos del Ritmo // 10.El Ultimo Beso-Los Doltons // 11.Little Red Rooster-Big Mama Thornton // 12.Blueberry Hill-Fats Domino // 13.Boogie Woogie Country Girl-Big Joe Turner // 14.La Bamba-Ritchie Valens // 15.Jambalaya-Fats Domino // 16.Long Tall Sally-Little Richard // 17.(Your Love Keeps Lifting Me) Higher and Higher-Jackie Wilson

photo cred

hiphopfightsplaque:

Elvis Who?//Listen Here

a playlist honoring the creativity of Black rock & roll artists and the rebellious Black youth who kept their records spinning. Also features some Rock en Español.

1.Caldonia-Louis Jordan //2.Shake, Rattle & Roll-Big Joe Turner // 3.Bo Diddley-Bo Diddley // 4.Demolicion-Los Saicos // 5.Johnny B. Goode-Chuck Berry // 6.Tuttie Frutti-Little Richard // 7.Hound Dog-Big Mama Thornton // 8.Roll Over Beethoven-Chuck Berry // 9.La Chica Alborotada-Los Locos del Ritmo // 10.El Ultimo Beso-Los Doltons // 11.Little Red Rooster-Big Mama Thornton // 12.Blueberry Hill-Fats Domino // 13.Boogie Woogie Country Girl-Big Joe Turner // 14.La Bamba-Ritchie Valens // 15.Jambalaya-Fats Domino // 16.Long Tall Sally-Little Richard // 17.(Your Love Keeps Lifting Me) Higher and Higher-Jackie Wilson

photo cred

April 19 2014   •   738   •   VIA   •   SRC
rollership:

mordmardok- c.1913 - Stones thrown by Suffragettes 
through the Buckingham Palace window

rollership:

mordmardok- c.1913 - Stones thrown by Suffragettes 

through the Buckingham Palace window

April 16 2014   •   483   •   VIA   •   SRC
#history   

humanoidhistory:

On April 16, 1972, the Apollo 16 mission blasted off from Cape Canaveral on a journey to the Moon. Astronauts John Young, Charlie Duke, and Ken Mattingly went on the penultimate adventure of the Apollo program with a mission that lasted 11 days, 1 hour, and 51 minutes, ending at 2:45 PM EST on April 27.

April 16 2014   •   948   •   VIA   •   SRC
April 16 2014   •   2414   •   VIA   •   SRC
#history   

Greek myths mention several Islands of Women, where Amazons lived without men, only consorting with neighboring colonies of males at certain seasons when they wanted to conceive their children. Taurus, Lemnos, and Lesbos were said to be such all-female societies. The Greeks apparently feared them. They said the women of Taurus sacrificed to their Goddess all men who landed on their shores; and the women of Lemnos had risen up against their husband and murdered all of them at once. The Greek writers seemed to have no doubt that women could destroy whole populations of adult males, and there was no effective defense against them.

 - The Woman’s Encyclopedia of Myths and Secrets, Barbara G. Walker (p. 26)
April 06 2014   •   21803   •   VIA   •   SRC
#quotes   #history   
laughterkey:

cumaeansibyl:

this is legit btw
I mean, there were folkloric heroes like Robin Hood before the Scarlet Pimpernel, but they didn’t really do the secret identity — people might not have known Robin Hood’s real identity but he wasn’t out living a double life and his costume was just what he and his buds wore in the forest, whereas the Pimpernel was actually doing the exact same thing as Bruce Wayne (pampered aristocrat by day, avenging hero by night)
also I wanna point out that the Scarlet Pimpernel was actually the leader of a league of twenty people also living double lives — Baroness Orczy also invented the first superhero team

Also The Scarlet Pimpernel is goddamned amazing and if you’ve never read it you’re missing out.

laughterkey:

cumaeansibyl:

this is legit btw

I mean, there were folkloric heroes like Robin Hood before the Scarlet Pimpernel, but they didn’t really do the secret identity — people might not have known Robin Hood’s real identity but he wasn’t out living a double life and his costume was just what he and his buds wore in the forest, whereas the Pimpernel was actually doing the exact same thing as Bruce Wayne (pampered aristocrat by day, avenging hero by night)

also I wanna point out that the Scarlet Pimpernel was actually the leader of a league of twenty people also living double lives — Baroness Orczy also invented the first superhero team

Also The Scarlet Pimpernel is goddamned amazing and if you’ve never read it you’re missing out.

April 02 2014   •   27311   •   VIA   •   SRC
#comics   #(kinda)   #books   #history   #EXCELLENT   

Unlikely simultaneous historical events

tastyrepulsorboots:

sebpatrick:

quantumblog:

jkottke:

A poster on Reddit asks: What are two events that took place in the same time in history but don’t seem like they would have?

Spain was still a fascist dictatorship when Microsoft was founded.

There were no classes in calculus in Harvard’s curriculum for the first few years because calculus hadn’t been discovered yet.

Two empires [Roman & Ottoman] spanned the entire gap from Jesus to Babe Ruth.

When the pyramids were being built, there were still woolly mammoths.

The last use of the guillotine was in France the same year Star Wars came out.

Oxford University was over 300 years old when the Aztec Empire was founded.

I know it’s less of a shock if you read His Last Bow, but it does blow my mind a bit that there’s an entire collection of ACD Holmes stories that were written and published after World War I.

 (x)

March 30 2014   •   25326   •   VIA   •   SRC

soupengine:

[news source]

can you imagine not being able to go downtown because one day you turn on the news and learn that its infested with poisonous cobras?

March 29 2014   •   49   •   VIA   •   SRC

Claire’s fancy-pants HISTORICAL FASHION MASTER POST

shoomlah:

image

So my historical costuming resources list from 2011 was less than a page long- I’m not saying that I’ve learned a lot in the past three years, but this list is now sitting pretty at a solid nine pages.  Whew.  And people wonder why I want to redo this damn series.

This list is by no means an exhaustive one- it’s a list of (primarily western) historical fashion resources, both online and offline, that is limited to what I know, own, or use!  It’s a work in progress, and I’m definitely hoping to expand on it as my knowledge base grows.  First things first, how about a little:

ADVICE FOR RESEARCHING HISTORICAL FASHION

  • Read, and read about more than just costuming.  Allowing yourself to understand the cultural and historical context surrounding the clothing of a particular region/period can be invaluable in sussing out good costume design.  Looking at pictures is all well and good, but reading about societal pressures, about construction techniques, daily routines, local symbolism, whatever else will really help you understand the rhyme and reason behind costuming from any given context.
  • Expand your costume vocabulary.  When you’re delving into a new topic, costuming or otherwise, picking up new terminology is essential to proper understanding and furthering your research.  Write down or take note of terms as you come across them- google them, look up synonyms, and use those words as a jumping off point for more research.  What’s a wire rebato?  How does it differ from a supportasse?  Inquiring minds want to know.
  • Double-check your sources.  Especially on the internet, and double especially on tumblr.  I love it, but it’s ground zero for rapidly spreading misinformation.  Books are usually your safest bet, but also take into account their date of publication, who’s writing them- an author’s biases can severely mangle their original source material.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask for help.  Do everything you can to find out information on your own, but feel free to reach out to people with more specialized areas of knowledge for help!  Be considerate about it- the people you’re asking are busy as well- but a specific line of questioning that proves you’re passionate and that you respect their subject matter expertise can work wonders.

Okay, onto the links!

image

It’s impossible to overstate the importance of getting off the internet and looking into books!  God bless the internet, but books are (generally, this isn’t a rule) better-researched and better-sourced.  Bibliographies also mean each individual books can be a jumping off point for further research, which is always a fantastic thing.

Remember- owning books is awesome and you should absolutely assemble your own library of resources, but LIBRARIES.  Libraries.  You’ll be surprised to find what books are available to you at your local library.

GENERAL / SURVEYS

Patterns fo Fashion books
Detailed, hand-drawn diagrams of historical fashion, inside and out.  Pretty amazing stuff.

Fashion in Detail books
Not what you want if you’re looking for photos of entire costumes- note the “in detail” bit up there.  Just a beautiful series, and great reference for all the little things you might miss otherwise.  The V&A has an amazing fashion collection, and it’s great to see them share it with the world.

image

Read More

March 22 2014   •   24543   •   VIA   •   SRC
knivesandglitter:

capecarra:

applecocaine:

myjamflavouredmindtardis:

megan15:

theybuildbuildings:

vintagegal:

Girls pose by a jail that recalls the witch trials of 1692 in Salem, Massachusetts. Photo taken in 1945.

I recently learned that the water in Salem was contaminated with the fungus from which LSD is derived and a legitimate theory for the whole thing is that everyone in the town was tripping balls 

This might be the greatest thing ive ever seen on the internet

We did a whole massive thing on this in history. I believe the fungus in question is called Ergot and it’s terrifying. It makes your muscles spasm so when they had seizures that was the reason, not because they were possessed. One woman had to be strapped to her bed, she was seizing so bad. And, like ‘theybuildbuildings’ said, it had the same effects as LSD; as soon as you touch it, let alone consume it, it messes with your entire system. The worst thing is, you practically always had a bad trip. Many complained about bugs crawling under their skin or monsters emerging from the shadows to scratch and bite at them until they were screaming. It was a horrendous thing and the worst part is, Ergot is still around. It grows on crops and, if your wheat isn’t properly treated, it can be eaten and you’ll most likely experience the same as the women of Salem. 

god i love history

Except that:
Ergotism was well known by the time of the trials, the symptoms probably would have been identified. It was considered a terrifying disease for over a thousand years, known as “holy fire” or “St. Andrew’s Fire”. The most telling sign of ergotism, gangrene, wasn’t even present. It is uncommon for ergotism to be marked solely by convulsions.
Ergotism didn’t poison the water supply. If it had been a threat to the town it would have been through consumption of rye.
You’re underestimating the importance of William Griggs, the town doctor who diagnosed the so-called witchcraft. It wasn’t until after he diagnosed Betty that the accusations and claims from the girls started.
The girls were described as “hale and hearthy” outside of court. Ergotism wasn’t called “the holy fire” because it was mild. It was awful, with rates of fatality between 10-40%. Little was mentioned of vomiting, gastrointestinal issues, skin color change, chills, headaches…. The basic symptoms.
To disregard the unbelievable affect of class and gender on the Puritans is shocking. A wild fungus may seem more interesting, but it disregards prejudice, religion bases psychosis, misogyny, and hate for outsiders that permeated Salem. 
Everyone accused was a social pariah. The only exceptions to this are the people who questioned the trials. This is not by accident. Sarah Good was a beggar, Giles Corey was generally distrusted and had previously been accused of murder, Tituba was a black woman who spoke of omens and evil, Martha Carrier had been accused of witchcraft only two years prior and had inherited wealth despite patriarchal norms, Sarah Osbourne was challenging property laws and social norms, Margaret Scott was a poor widow who had been disliked for as long as 20 years, and so on and so on. They struck out against people their families were suspicious of.
These little girls were under tremendous stress. They could celebrate no holidays, express no strong emotions, no dancing or music, no toys, suffered rampant abuse espoused as discipline, and lived under the constant overwhelming fear of Hell. The older generation at that time was bemoaning the youths’ lack of piety and dedication to Christ. In other words, the girls were miserable and well aware that according to their parents only Hell awaited their misbehavior. They were trying to survive in an adult world not meant, or willing to, support the needs of children. To display anger, fear, or sorrow was a personal weakness. But to do so when coerced by the devil was perfectly acceptable. So they acted out, became hysterical. And claimed the devil was behind it all.
That may not be as exciting as the, “but they ate this spore, right? and it was like a bad trip on LSD!” but it’s almost certainly correct. 

THIS COMMENTARY I HAVE BEEN TRYING TO TELL PEOPLE THIS FOR YEARS.

knivesandglitter:

capecarra:

applecocaine:

myjamflavouredmindtardis:

megan15:

theybuildbuildings:

vintagegal:

Girls pose by a jail that recalls the witch trials of 1692 in Salem, Massachusetts. Photo taken in 1945.

I recently learned that the water in Salem was contaminated with the fungus from which LSD is derived and a legitimate theory for the whole thing is that everyone in the town was tripping balls 

This might be the greatest thing ive ever seen on the internet

We did a whole massive thing on this in history. I believe the fungus in question is called Ergot and it’s terrifying. It makes your muscles spasm so when they had seizures that was the reason, not because they were possessed. One woman had to be strapped to her bed, she was seizing so bad. And, like ‘theybuildbuildings’ said, it had the same effects as LSD; as soon as you touch it, let alone consume it, it messes with your entire system. The worst thing is, you practically always had a bad trip. Many complained about bugs crawling under their skin or monsters emerging from the shadows to scratch and bite at them until they were screaming. It was a horrendous thing and the worst part is, Ergot is still around. It grows on crops and, if your wheat isn’t properly treated, it can be eaten and you’ll most likely experience the same as the women of Salem. 

god i love history

Except that:

  • Ergotism was well known by the time of the trials, the symptoms probably would have been identified. It was considered a terrifying disease for over a thousand years, known as “holy fire” or “St. Andrew’s Fire”. The most telling sign of ergotism, gangrene, wasn’t even present. It is uncommon for ergotism to be marked solely by convulsions.
  • Ergotism didn’t poison the water supply. If it had been a threat to the town it would have been through consumption of rye.
  • You’re underestimating the importance of William Griggs, the town doctor who diagnosed the so-called witchcraft. It wasn’t until after he diagnosed Betty that the accusations and claims from the girls started.
  • The girls were described as “hale and hearthy” outside of court. Ergotism wasn’t called “the holy fire” because it was mild. It was awful, with rates of fatality between 10-40%. Little was mentioned of vomiting, gastrointestinal issues, skin color change, chills, headaches…. The basic symptoms.

To disregard the unbelievable affect of class and gender on the Puritans is shocking. A wild fungus may seem more interesting, but it disregards prejudice, religion bases psychosis, misogyny, and hate for outsiders that permeated Salem. 

Everyone accused was a social pariah. The only exceptions to this are the people who questioned the trials. This is not by accident. Sarah Good was a beggar, Giles Corey was generally distrusted and had previously been accused of murder, Tituba was a black woman who spoke of omens and evil, Martha Carrier had been accused of witchcraft only two years prior and had inherited wealth despite patriarchal norms, Sarah Osbourne was challenging property laws and social norms, Margaret Scott was a poor widow who had been disliked for as long as 20 years, and so on and so on. They struck out against people their families were suspicious of.

These little girls were under tremendous stress. They could celebrate no holidays, express no strong emotions, no dancing or music, no toys, suffered rampant abuse espoused as discipline, and lived under the constant overwhelming fear of Hell. The older generation at that time was bemoaning the youths’ lack of piety and dedication to Christ. In other words, the girls were miserable and well aware that according to their parents only Hell awaited their misbehavior. They were trying to survive in an adult world not meant, or willing to, support the needs of children. To display anger, fear, or sorrow was a personal weakness. But to do so when coerced by the devil was perfectly acceptable. So they acted out, became hysterical. And claimed the devil was behind it all.

That may not be as exciting as the, “but they ate this spore, right? and it was like a bad trip on LSD!” but it’s almost certainly correct. 

THIS COMMENTARY I HAVE BEEN TRYING TO TELL PEOPLE THIS FOR YEARS.

March 18 2014   •   297542   •   VIA   •   SRC