wrote-miss-ibis:

cellarspider:

lyricalred:

whiskyrunner:

Just a reminder:the natural diet of these birds is BONES. Not just bone marrow; actual bone shards. They pick up huge freaking bones from carcasses and drop them onto rocks until they get spiky pieces and then they swallow them. Their stomach acid dissolves bone.

look me in the eye and tell me that’s not a fucking dragon

And they aren’t naturally red like that. That’s self-applied makeup. They find the reddest earth they can to work into their feathers as a status symbol.

And they don’t scavenge other parts of carcases, just the bones. 85-90% of their diet is exclusively bone. Hence why it’s only a myth that these birds would just pick up whole lambs and carry them off. It’s not true, but in German they’re still called Lämmergeier as a result.

So metal

Compilation of links on Forensic Anthropology:

zomganthro:

klariza-helps:

Various links leading back to blogs, articles, rebloggable posts, or asks. Some of these links lead to even more, which is why it seems rather short. I’ve been compiling this for more of a future reference thing for myself, but figured it’s worth sharing. Don’t try anything like these links anywhere except in your writing, please; use it for research purposes, though your research should not end here. Local libraries have plenty of material that could teach you more than the below links, and make sure you know your material before diving into writing without knowing the topic at hand.

For general mystery writing help, check out The Writer’s Helper’s tag or the Write World Mystery tag. You can find a blog dedicated to forensics here. Find the rest of the crime writing series here

WARNING: Graphic images may or may not be in the links below, so please be careful. 

Full disclosure: I haven’t looked at most of these but I imagine a few must be helpful

explore-blog:

22 years ago today, the first photo was uploaded to the web – and it was of an all-girl science rock band from CERN, signing about colliders, quarks, and antimatter.
Oh, and they were actually really, really good.

explore-blog:

22 years ago today, the first photo was uploaded to the web – and it was of an all-girl science rock band from CERN, signing about colliders, quarks, and antimatter.

Oh, and they were actually really, really good.

thefrecklebum:

things-jo-says:

m0nstermommy:

I can not STAND people that don’t take owning reptiles seriously.

You can’t just buy them a house, give them water, turn off their lamps, and call it a day. They take so much more care than that. 

I am talking about people who get monitors, beardies, snakes, & stuff like that. Getting a little turtle is not that much work. My stepdad and mom raise Poison Dart Frogs (which btw are not poisnous in captivity) and people want to buy them for their kids ALL the time. They won’t sell to people like that. Frogs are a lot of fucking work. Keep up with their vivs, cultures, and news flash YOU CAN’T HOLD FROGS. They aren’t dogs.

Someone posted earlier a picture of their monitor. They live in apartment. Yes, right now the monitor isn’t that big but do you know how big monitors get??? Have you seen a full grow black throat monitor, or even a savannah monitor, in person? They are HUGE. People who own them literally have to create dog runs for them. You can’t keep those things in a cage! 

Don’t even get me started on snakes. 

Please people… reptiles are not like fish. They need to be properly taken care of. Don’t be an uneducated ass hole. 

I like this but your ‘Reptiles Are Not Like Fish. They need to be properly taken care of’ is bullshit.

All animals need to be taken care of properly. It does not matter what it is. If you throw a pair of goldfish into a bowl or really anything less them 35-150 gallons you are an asshole and don’t deserve that animal.

THANK YOU FOR SAYING THAT

watershedplus:

On rare years when the conditions are right in the arid landscape of the Badlands, in the American West, wildflowers burst into a display of colour for just a few days.
The vegetation in the region has adapted to the climate, with just a small amount of moisture the desert can become coloured with sweeping fields of Scorpion Weed, Beeplant and the flowers of the Pincushion Cacti. These blooms can be very short-lived to conserve moisture.

Photographs by Guy Tal

From here

hey, I am an undergrad but I had a class w/ a journal club where we learned how to "read" papers and the best thing we were taught to do is read, reread, and at all points, take notes. seriously, just have a sheet of paper where you write down all the definitions, symbols, equations along with their meaning. summarize each paragraph. diagram out the experiment if one isn't included. find the figures in the text and make sure their conclusions make sense. once you've done all that, read it again

nonlinearfluctuations:

Hi, I hope it is okay if I publish this since I was also asked by another student, schrodingerspanda.

Thanks! This is really helpful. (Sorry I didn’t mean to exclude undergrads. I feel like for me trying to read papers as an undergrad, I had so much difficulty that I definitely wouldn’t be able to answer a question like this)

So it sounds like for me I need to just spend a LOT more time than I am spending reading through these papers. I am trying to run a journal club for my lab (I have never been in one before) so I can work on how to “read” papers by reading more papers and discussing them, but I feel like that hasn’t been helping as much. After reading your response though, I think I will just try to take my time and try to break up the paper, reread, etc. Does it eventually become faster? I started feeling discouraged since some other students I have talked to have told me they can read the abstract and the conclusion and basically know what is going on in the paper from that and know if it is a good/worthwhile paper or now. I feel like I will never get to that point…

yeah i don’t have a problem with people publishing my asks! so don’t worry!

 i think the people who can get away without reading the whole paper and actually understand what is going on are very limited. also, they may not actually know what is happening, at all. if you aren’t analyzing the introduction, methods, and data sections, you’re missing a huge chunk of the paper that is worthy of critique. i’ve seen authors include things off hand in their site description that really called into question their results. and it is up to you to determine whether the experimental methods were good ones or if the resulting data makes sense. you can’t just rely on the conclusion section to tell you that, because most people aren’t going to admit they messed up out of fear of not getting published.

if all you do is read the abstract and conclusion, you might “know” what the experiment was and what results the authors got; however, you probably won’t be able to determine whether or not the experiment was well-run or if the data is truly useful. there’s a difference between being able to judge a book by the synopsis and tell someone what the book is about, and actually reading the book and detailing the merits of the narrative. people who say otherwise, in my opinion, are deluding themselves.

anyway, i find reading papers, particularly dense ones that involve equations or genetics (i study biology) very difficult. and i often struggle not only because the experiment is complicated, but because i don’t always know everything that the authors know, which is why i make note of everything I don’t understand in my first read-through and I go and investigate it. don’t feel bad if you have the same difficulties. pretty much everyone i know but two people (who were grad students) have a lot of difficulty parsing papers, and that includes our professors at times!

i think it gets easier the more often you analyze a paper like that, and you can move through them quicker. but if you want to know whether or not a paper is worth using to support your own research, it deserves at least some of your time. so while you might get faster at reading papers, it might never actually be a quick process. 

Hey Shychemist. I've been following your blog for awhile and I want to bring up something that seems dated but nonetheless holds to be accurate today. I feel like the girls who consider themselves to be on the science side of tumblr to be horribly mistaken. It's statistically proven that women applicants struggle to get into stem doctorate programs, and rightfully so, they don't belong there. examples- atomic-o-licious, brainsx , adventuresinchemistry, i can't fit anymore but you get it
Anonymous

i-am-a-quesodillo:

hannahoort:

astropheminism:

nonlinearfluctuations:

chemistry-of-chaos:

dinostuck:

scientistsarepeopletoo:

adventuresinchemistry:

smilesandvials:

shychemist:

It doesn’t seem dated, your attitude is dated. This is the 21st century.

Women deserve to be in STEM programs just as much as men. I’d wager they deserve to succeed in the Sciences even more than men because of the sexism and misogyny they experience.

They struggle to get in because they’re the minority, and a lot of people who could admit them are sexist (regardless of gender) because of the society they grew up in. Its not through any intellectual weakness. These women are amazing and just as smart as the men in their fields.

You have no right to say these things to these amazing women, many of whom I consider to be friends.

image
Wow. That seems like really fucking wrong. And offensive.
And I would love to take some more time out of my day to be pissed about it.
But…
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It seems that I have a lot of fucking science to do. 
So, uh, screw that.
If anybody needs me, me and my lady bits will be getting some fucking science done.

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I’m oddly excited to have been name checked by this shitty anon. Because it means that the very fact that I got into an Ivy League, top 15 science PhD program (where I fucking belong) is a giant fuck you to shitty anon. Also, shitty anons make Lewis sad. Because Lewis is a feminists science hippo.

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imageBest way for me to deal with shitty nonnies who think women can’t do science? DO MORE SCIENCE!!!! MWAHAHAHA

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Crap, I’m a woman biologist. I’d go get another career but I have a groundbreaking thesis on rapid evolution of reproductive isolation between seed beetle populations to finish. 

I’m not a well-known tumblr scientist…but I am a scientist all the same. And while I could probably obtain a more gender-appropriate occupation… I’m pretty content with the fact I’m an atmospheric chemist Additionally, I am also one of the few women who have managed to be selected to intern at NASA’s airborne research program. 

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Do I not deserve a place in the STEM fields, anon? 

Hey ladies! Mind if some physicists join in?

At the CERN visiting the CMS part of the LHC where were were working for 8 months on both computational and experimental work:

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Presenting our research at a conference on Physics of Living Systems:
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And visiting the Wind Tunnel experiment after presenting our research at Max Planck Institute at a Advances in Cardiac Dynamics Workshop

image

Oh, me? What do I do? I try to understand why superbursts happen in neutron stars! This is important because: they shouldn’t happen but they do. And the implications could be astoundingly helpful for things like, oh I don’t know, nuclear fusion.

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Oh, just me, at a conference after presenting this:

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"don’t belong there"?! excuse you! 
Im not a science tumblr but i am a girl and a geologist so i kinda prove you wrong…?

In the Sorbas Basin finding fossilised bird trackways and fossilised rain drops
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Using HCl to dissolve solnhofen plattenkalk (limestones) to make plastic copies of exceptional fossils  

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On board the HMS Discovery, a state of the art scientific ship which anchors at the NOC (national oceanography centre Southampton)

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Doing some geological mapping and fieldwork in Ingleton Yorkshire

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So yeh anon, you’re wrong and very very very outdated in your opinions 

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And this is me, working on a juvenile fish survey for different species of endangered diandromous fish.

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Which includes a lot of heavy lifting work such as seining (which includes dragging a 200 ft net through the water and examining what you caught) and carrying heavy buckets full of fish around to measure and assess their data.

Hey, what do you know about this Kendall jones girl that's been making the rounds lately? The one who apparently killed lions tigers and elephants, is it relatively the same deal as the girl who was last photographed posing with a dead lion that you explained was for tourism and legal?

naturepunk:

Prettymuch. Kendall Jones’s hunts in Africa are made possible only through very closely-regulated hunting programs. All funds go back to conservation efforts to keep the parks running when eco-tourism alone isn’t enough. Unlike National Parks in the USA, which get supplemental funding from taxpayers, reserves in Africa are largely privately-owned and don’t get any means of funding outside of the revenue they rake in as the result of tourism - And trophy hunting. 

Each animal killed by paying hunters is predetermined as a target by park guides prior to the hunt. They pick animals which are too old or sick to reproduce, or which have been causing too many issues with locals. The elimination of these animals actually benefits the park ecology, so why not make some money in the process? 

Let’s take a look at how much money Kendall’s various hunting adventures have brought to the table. A simple Google search for “Cost of African Safari hunt” brings up the following numbers.

African male lion - $30,000.00

Bull elephant - $42,000.00. 

Leopard - $25,000.00. 

Hippo - $13,000.00. 

Buffalo - $15,000.00. 

Wildebeest - $1,000.00. 
 
White springbok - $15,000.00

Blesbuck - $950.00. 

Kendall has taken at least one of each of the following animals. Given this, we can calculate that she has likely spent AT LEAST $127,000.00 on trophy permits alone. This does not cover the cost of CITES permits, accommodations, and guide fees for each hunt, nor do I have the time or patience to look through all of Kendall’s trophy photos to determine how many of which species she’s killed on her various hunts. In total, the amount that she’s generated for Africa’s parks is likely much, much more. 

Point is, I doubt that the animal rights activists calling for Kendall’s demise have donated anywhere near as much money to wildlife in Africa as Kendall has singlehandedly. Awkward.


Hunting also benefits indigenous people, who are often given the meat from hunters’ kills, and even the World Wildlife Fund recognizes the importance of regulated trophy hunts! 

Also, for the record, the rhino that Kendall is posing next to in her most recent hunting photos is not even dead - she shot it with a tranquilizer gun so that a conservation group could give it a radio collar and vet care. She is literally working side-by-side with the people who make a living protecting these animals.

In short, you don’t have to like what Kendall is doing, but please educate yourself on the topic before making bullshit remarks. And keep in mind that just because you’re not okay with trophy hunting doesn’t mean that Kendall needs to adhere to your ideologies; her beliefs regarding animal life are different from yours, and probably mine, too, but so long as it’s legal and provides much-needed income to protect the rest of the animals on the reserve, she’s still doing a hell of a lot more for the continued survival of the species than anyone complaining about it on the internet. 

watson and crick more like asshole and prick amirite
— Rosalind Franklin (via bropunzeling)

stromatolith:

Ahh I couldn’t figure out how to respond to Pipeworks’s question/comment, so I’m replying in a post!  I hope you see this - sorry I’m incompetent!

The study of the geologic evidence for the evolution of life and terrestrial climate comes under many names: biogeochemistry, geochemistry, geophysics, paleontology, organismic and evolutionary biology, planetary science, and historical geobiology.  ”Historical Geobiology” is specifically about rebuilding the narrative of life on earth.  In other words, telling the story of how life got to be the way it is today.  Sometimes this means looking at macro- and micro-fossils from outcroppings and loose sediments.  And sometimes this means geochemical analyses, looking closely at the chemical content and internal structure of rocks.  Once you know what chemicals are present, you can say something about the climate in which a rock was formed or what kinds of living things were active at the time.  The class I’m taking next semester is particularly focused on mass extinctions, and the different kinds of data that scientists have used to constrain the dates and magnitudes of these catastrophic events.  If you’d like to know more about any piece of that, do let me know!  I’ve taken some related classes, and done some research in related fields…  ”Stromatolith” is literally the name of a type of geologic structure formed via the growth of microbial mats.  I love this stuff!

NO WAIT THAT SOUNDS SO FUCKING COOL PLS TELL ME EVERYTHING THAT YOU KNOW